patrickklepek

peregrinescry asked:

So I was thinking about the shift in focus that many game journalists have undergone in recent years, namely focusing more on the overall "culture" of a game and what it can represent. I can't help but wonder if this shift in focus is potentially influenced by a group of people growing up and wanting the thing they are significantly invested in, in this case video games, to have some sort of greater impact on the general populace and beginning to see many issues that simply are not present. Y/N?

patrickklepek answered:

That’s one way of viewing it. You can see a similar trend in video game stories; some have called it the “dadification” of video games. Essentially, game designers are growing up, having families, and wanting to see their own experiences represented in what they make. It’s why we’ve seen a great number of games specifically focused on a strong man taking care of a child in a bad situation. That’s pretty natural, if, perhaps, a narrow view on what it means to grow up (or even to be a parent—it ignores women).

Your last sentence might reveal your true intentions with the question, no?

 to have some sort of greater impact on the general populace and beginning to see many issues that simply are not present.

I’d disagree there. Is it possible game criticism, journalism, and cultural reflection sometimes talks about a certain subset of issues to the point that some are tuning them out? That’s possible, but I’d attribute that to gaming culture not taking responsibility—largely out of ignorance—for systematically cultivating that culture for decades. It makes sense there would be a certain amount of whiplash as we come to terms with what we’ve wrought. 

That’s part of growing up, too.